By Jenny Kemper, Director, Kemper Cognitive Wellness

In the office at Kemper Cognitive Wellness, Dr. Bergman will marvel from time to time how much money people are willing to spend on plastic surgery to make themselves look good.  But, he asks, what about ‘plastic surgery’ for your brain?  It’s available to us, and it doesn’t come with a big price tag.

Neuroplasticity & Neurogenesis

Brain plasticity, also known as neuroplasticity, refers to the brain’s ability to recover and restructure itself.  Neuroscientists once believed neuroplasticity only manifested during childhood, but research in the latter half of the 20th century showed that many aspects of the brain can be altered (“plastic”), even through adulthood.1

As a kid, 30-some years ago, I remember it being widely accepted that the brain was a “nonrenewable organ,” that we all receive a finite amount of brain cells at birth and they die off as we age, or more quickly depending on the choices we make.

Today we know that’s not true (at least the finite part, anyway).  Today, the human brain is considered to be a highly dynamic and constantly reorganizing system capable of being shaped and reshaped across an entire lifespan.  Neurogenesis, or the growth/regrowth of new brain cells, is a key factor in this dynamic.

So what does any of this have to do with Brain Boot Camp, you may ask? 

Everything!  Brain Boot Camp combines physical and cognitive exercise simultaneously to promote neurogenesis and form new neural networks.  It’s plastic surgery for your brain.  And it’s comparable to the cost of a fitness or yoga class.

“WHO noted the combination of physical exercise with brain stimulation was even more effective in targeting different areas of the brain.  The combination of both simultaneously yields the best results in creation of new neurons (brain cells), as well as the formation of new neuronal networks.”

The World Health Organization recently released a review of top interventions to prevent dementia and slow cognitive decline.  Nutrition, sleep, and stress management were included, but exercise was at the top of the list!  WHO noted the combination of physical exercise with brain stimulation was even more effective in targeting different areas of the brain.  The combination of both simultaneously yields the best results in creation of new neurons (brain cells), as well as the formation of new neuronal networks.

Join us at Brain Boot Camp!

Kemper has partnered with CrossFit Cleveland over the last 6 months to bring this class to west siders.   We are excited to announce a new, outdoor, summer option at Rocky River Park on the upper deck Wednesday evenings in July and August.  No need to sign up in advance; drop in for a 45-minute session and pay as you go.  Sessions include a warm-up, several combined physical and mental exercises, and a cool down. Click here to see an example exercise.

The Results are Real!

Here’s what some of our participants are saying about their Brain Boot Camp experience:

  • “Since starting Brain Boot Camp, I am experiencing less brain fog and better focus.” -61 yr old participant
  • “My leg strength has improved, and my reaction time is better. I am once again able to manage my own calendar.” -79 yr old participant with dementia, was unable to manage her calendar prior to Brain Boot Camp.

Check the schedule and sign up online at https://kemperwellness.com/bootcamp.

Instructor: Alison Connors, Certified Brain Health Trainer, FMCHC, NBC-HWC
Health & Wellness Coach, Kemper Cognitive Wellness

6 Sessions – $90

Don’t Become a Statistic!

  • Rates of dementia and other chronic diseases are on the rise
  • More than 5 million people in the U.S. are currently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease
  • According to the CDC, the number of people living with cognitive impairment is equal to twice the population of New York City
  • About 10,000 Americans will turn 65 every day for the next 10 years, and 15-20% of those 65 and older have Mild Cognitive Impairment, a diagnosis characterized by cognitive symptoms outside the normal course of aging

Call for more information 216/337-1400 x101, or visit us at KemperWellness.com/bootcamp – see you on the deck on Wednesday nights!

Sources

  1. Livingston RB (1966). “Brain mechanisms in conditioning and learning”. Neurosciences Research Program Bulletin. 4 (3): 349–354.